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Infertility

  • Poor women (along with lesbians, single women, older women and women with disabilities) have traditionally been excluded from accessing assisted reproductive technologies.[1]

  • Women with higher income and education do not experience higher rates of infertility. In fact, women in the lowest socioeconomic groups have the highest rates of infertility.[1][2]

  • Couples and individuals who experience infertility often experience guilt, low self-esteem, depression, disappointment, increased rates of relationship conflict and sexual dysfunction.[1]

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Can you think of ways in which the experience of infertility might differ for individuals who can and cannot afford treatment?

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1. Peterson, MM. Assisted reproductive technologies and equity of access issues. Journal of Medical Ethics 2005;31:280-5.

2. Jain, T, Hornstein, MD. Disparities in access to infertility services in a state with mandated insurance coverage. Fertility and Sterility 2005;221-3.

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