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Poverty in Canada

Statistics are a quick and useful way to present data about the state of poverty in Canada. However, the experiences of poverty are much more complex than the image created by the numbers presented here.[1]

1.True or false, in Canada in 2001, the overall rate of poverty was 10%.
False
True
2.True or false, women are disproportionately affected by poverty.
True
False
3.Which of the following family types has the highest rates of poverty?
Unattached (single, divorced, widowed) females over 65
Single parent fathers
Two-parent families with children
Single parent mothers
Unattached males under 65
4.True or false, the richest 20% of the Canadian population earns over 40% of the market income.
True
False
5.True or false, poverty rates are higher in families with more children and in which the children are less than school age.
True
False
6.True or false, 1 in 8 Canadian children live in poverty.
True
False
7.Which of the following statements about the immigrant population in Canada is false?
Immigrant women between the ages of 25 and 44 with university degrees earn $14,000 less per year than Canadian born women.
In immigrant families, the longer the duration of time in Canada of the major income earner, the higher the poverty rates.
The poverty rate in families in which the major income earner is Canadian born is lower compared with families in which the major income earner is an immigrant.
Individuals that are visible minorities are more likely to experience poverty and unemployment.
8.True or false, Aboriginal women have higher rates of poverty than Aboriginal men, and non-Aboriginal women and men.
True
False
References for this Activity
1. Canadian Research Institute for the Advancement of Women. Fact Sheet: Women and poverty. 2005. Available at: http://www.criaw-icref.ca/indexFrame_e.htm. Accessed July 2005.
2. National Council of Welfare. Poverty profile 2001. Ottawa, Minister of Public Works and Government Services Canada, 2004.
3. UN Platform for Action Committee Manitoba (UNPAC). Women and the economy. Available at: http://unpac.ca/economy/wei_main.html. Accessed July 2005.
4. Richards, T. Global university course launched on health advocacy. BMJ 2005;331:256.
5. Canadian Public Health Association. Board of Directors Discussion Paper. Health impacts of social and economic conditions: Implications for public policy. 2001. Ottawa, Canadian Public Health Association.
6. Lochhead, C, Scott, K. The dynamics of womens poverty in Canada. 2000. Ottawa, Canadian Council on Social Development.
7. Donner, L. Women, income and health in Manitoba: An overview and ideas for action. 2002. Winnipeg, Womens Health Clinic.

 

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1. Canadian Research Institute for the Advancement of Women. Fact Sheet: Women and poverty. 2005. Available at: http://www.criaw-icref.ca/indexFrame_e.htm. Accessed July 2005.

All references for this section