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The Environment of Poverty

Poor youth are more likely to reside in neighborhoods characterized by adverse physical and social environments and less likely to take advantage of outside social, recreational, and skill development activities than are non-poor youth. Lack of economic resources likely constrains parents’ residential choices and their ability to pay for fees and related materials required for youth to participate in neighbourhood and school organizations or activities. [1]

Social Environment:

The home or family environment is a central influence on emotional as well as cognitive and behavioural development [2], and it remains an important influence into adolescence [3]. Instability in the family environment causes acute stress for a child and may challenge a child’s sense of security and ability to cope with changes later in life. Given that normal adolescent development is characterized by dramatic changes in physical development, social relations, identity, sexuality and behaviour, high levels of family instability might be related to increased difficulty negotiating these  transitions and to poorer adolescent outcomes across a variety of developmental domains [4].

1.Poor adolescents are more likely to live with a single parent.
True     False
2.Poor adolescents are more likely to be unpopular and rejected by their peers.
True     False
3.Poor adolescents are more likely to be involved in extracurricular activities.
True     False
4.Poor parents are more likely to engage in higher levels of conflict with their youth.
True     False
References for this Activity
1. Abernathy, T. J., Webster, G., Vermeulen, M. (2002) Relationship Between Poverty and Health Among Adolescents. Adolescence, 37, 145 , 55-67.
2. 7. Bolger, K. E., Patterson, C. J., Thompson, W. W., and Kupersmidt, i. B. (1995). Psychosocial adjustment among children experiencing persistent and intermittent family economic hardship. Child Dev. 66: 1107-1129
3. Patterson, C. J., Vaden, N. A., and Kupersmidt, J. B. (1991). Family background, recent life events and peer rejection during childhood. J. Soc. Person. Rel. 8: 347-361.
4. 9. Vernberg, E. M. (1990). Psychological adjustment and experiences with peers during early adolescence: Reciprocal, incidental, or unidirectional relationships. J. Abnorm. Child Psychol. 18: 187-198.
5. Hao, L. (1995). Poverty, public assistance, and children in intact and single-mother families. J. Fam. Econ. Issues 16: 181-205.
6. Eamon, M. K. (2002). Influences and mediators of the effect of poverty on young adolescent depressive symptoms. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 31:3, 231-242.

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1. Abernathy, T. J., Webster, G., Vermeulen, M. (2002) Relationship Between Poverty and Health Among Adolescents. Adolescence, 37, 145 , 55-67.

2. Vernberg, E. M. (1990). Psychological adjustment and experiences with peers during early adolescence: Reciprocal, incidental, or unidirectional relationships. J. Abnorm. Child Psychol. 18: 187-198.

3. Hao, L. (1995). Poverty, public assistance, and children in intact and single-mother families. J. Fam. Econ. Issues 16: 181-205.

4. Schubiner, H., Scott, R., and Tzelepis, A. (1993). Exposure to violence among inner-city youth. J. Adolesc. Health 14: 214-219.

All references for this section