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CaRMS Match

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The following tables are taken from the CaRMS PGY-1 2003 Match Report[7]. Note the specialities in bold to help guide you in looking at the tables from a gender perspective.

Specialties

Female n=610

Male n=621

Specialties

1st Choice

Matched to 1st

1st Choice

Matched to 1st

#

%

#

%

#

%

#

%

Anesthesia

37

6.1

27

4.4

46

7.4

35

5.6

Diagnostic Rad

21

3.4

11

1.8

59

9.5

32

5.1

Emergency Med

11

1.8

10

1.6

17

2.7

10

1.6

Family Med*

197

32.3

194

31.8

111

17.9

107

17.2

Internal Med

90

14.8

78

12.8

96

15.5

80

12.9

Lab Med

7

1.2

5

0.8

15

2.4

13

2.1

Neurology

11

1.8

8

1.4

11

1.8

10

1.6

Obs/Gyn

52

8.5

40

6.6

6

1.0

5

0.8

Pediatrics

65

10.7

46

7.6

26

4.2

21

3.4

Psychiatry

36

5.9

33

5.4

36

5.8

31

4.9

***Surgery

58

9.5

39

6.4

176

28.3

129

20.8

***Other

25

4.1

17

2.8

22

3.5

18

2.9

Total 1st Career Choice

610

100.00

508

83.3

621

100.00

491

79.1

Matched to second choice career and lower

63

10.3

54

8.7

Unmatched

39

6.4

76

* includes rural family medicine, 10 military programs and 1 integrated rural family medicine and community medicine

2003 Residency Match in Surgery

Surgery

***Surgery

Female n=610

Male n=621

Specialties

1st Choice

Matched to 1st

1st Choice

Matched to 1st

#

%

#

%

#

%

#

%

Cardiac Surgery

3

0.5

3

0.5

6

1.0

4

0.7

General Surgery

17

2.8

17

2.8

29

4.7

29

4.7

Neurosurgery

1

0.2

1

0.2

21

3.4

16

2.6

Ophthalmology

5

0.8

5

0.8

17

2.7

12

1.9

Orthopedic Surgery

8

1.3

6

1.0

44

7.1

36

5.8

Otolaryngology

8

1.3

3

0.5

19

3.1

9

1.5

Plastic Surgery

11

1.8

3

0.5

19

3.1

9

1.5

Urology

5

0.8

1

0.2

23

3.7

14

2.3

58

9.5

39

6.4

176

28.3

129

20.8

Some interesting points:

  • Why isn’t OB/Gyn listed as a surgical specialty ?

  • The pool of women choosing obstetrics/gynecology increased by 70% from 2002.

  • Six men chose obstetrics/gynecology in 2003, compared to seven in 2002.

  • 7.1% of males ranked orthopedic surgery as their first choice, up from 5.2% in 2002.

  • 4.7% of males ranked general surgery as their first choice, down from 6.9% in 2002.

  • The number of men and women choosing anesthesia, diagnostic radiology, and internal medicine increased from 2002.

  • The number of men choosing psychiatry increased from 2002.[7]

Note the gender differences in certain specialities and the lack of one in others.

1.

Are there gender BIASES in certain specialities? What factors might contribute to a gender bias in speciality choice? Speculate as to trends in speciality choice by gender.

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7. Canadian Resident Matching Service. PGY-1 Match Report 2003. [Website] . Accessed on-line July 26, 2004.

All references for this section